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MOTYER, Lt. Arthur John

Male 1886 - 1916  (30 years)
   Has 12 ancestors but no descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name MOTYER, Arthur John 
    Prefix Lt. 
    Relationshipwith Léonce Reginald "Tupsy" MOTYER
    Born 2 Sep 1886  Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 15 Sep 1916  Battle of the Somme (WW-I), Lucheux, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Shot & killed during WW-I 
    Buried Sunken Road Cemetery, Contalmaison, Somme Department, Picardie Region, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    End of Lines
    Person ID I155  MOTYER Family Genealogy
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2016 

    Father MOTYER, Ephraim Jr.,   b. Abt 1854, Bridport, Dorsetshire County (now Dorset County), England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Aug 1920, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 66 years) 
    Mother HOLLIS, Thompson Robinson,   b. 24 Jul 1855, Devonshire Parish, Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1904, Pembroke Parish, Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Married 5 Jun 1879  Pembroke Parish, Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Royal Gazette 17 Jun 1879
      Ephraim Motyer, a native of Bridport, Dorset, England, married Thompson Robinson Hollis, 2nd. daughter of O. C. Hollis, on Jun 5 in Pembroke, at the residence of the bride's grandmother, by Rev. E. B. Moore.
    Marriage Site Pembroke Parish, Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Methodist Church 
    Children 2 children 
    Family ID F55  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Custom Events MOTYER, Arthur John 
    _UID 8FDF5B3EE7EA437584D1E98591AD273FF77C 
    Graduated 1905  Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Mount Allison University 
    • JMM-BDA-2011: This is a guess on my part. There was an Arthur Motyer who graduted from Mount Allison in 1905, and this Arthur Motyer is the only one in my database who's birthday makes it posible that he would've graduated around 1905.
    History 22 May 1915  Bermuda Find all individuals with events at this location 
    The Royal Gazette: PRIVATE A. J. MOTYER 
    • A rumour has been in circulation during the past week, starting as such rumours do, from what source no one knows, to the effect that Private A. J. Motyer had been taken prisoner.
      It is gratifying to know that his parents have by this mail, received a card from him dated 25th April 1915, saying "Quite well". It would spare much pain & anxiety to those with friends at the seat of war, if more caution was observed in the repeating of unfounded rumours.
    Cemetery 1916  Contalmaison, Somme Department, Picardie Region, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Sunken Road Cemetery 
    • Grave Reference/Panel Number: II. B. 9.

      The Sunken Road British Cemetery was made in July-October, 1916, during the middle fighting in the Somme offensive. There are now over 200 casualties from between 1914-1918 commemorated in this site. Of these, a small number are unidentified. Three Australian graves, which cannot be located, are represented by special memorials. The graves of two German soldiers, buried by the enemy at the end of March 1918, have been removed. The cemetery covers an area of 1,106 square meters, without the access road, and is enclosed by a low red brick wall.

      Contalmaison is a village in the Department of the Somme, 6 kilometers east-north-east of Albert. The Sunken Road, from which the cemetery is named, is part of the Contalmaison-Pozieres road, and the cemetery lies a little east of the road. The smaller cemetery on the other side of road, is the Canadian Sunken Road Cemetery.

      The Battle of the Somme, fought in the summer & autumn of 1916, was one of the largest battles of the First World War. With more than one million casualties, it was also one of the bloodiest battles in human history. The Allied forces attempted to break through the German lines along a 25-mile (40 km) front, north & south of the River Somme, in northern France. One purpose of the battle was to draw German forces away from the Battle of Verdun; however, by its end, the losses on the Somme had exceeded those at Verdun.

      Verdun would bite deep into the national consciousness of France for generations, and the Somme would have the same effect on generations of Britons. The battle is best remembered for its first day, 1 July 1916, on which the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - the bloodiest day in the history of the British Army. As terrible as the battle was for the British Empire troops who suffered there, it naturally affected the other nationalities as well. One German officer (Captain von Hentig) famously described it as "the muddy grave of the German field army". By the end of the battle, the British had learned many lessons in modern warfare, while the Germans had suffered irreplaceable losses. British historian Sir James Edmonds stated: "It is not too much to claim that the foundations of the final victory on the Western Front were laid by the Somme offensive of 1916."

      For the first time, the home front in the United Kingdom was exposed to the horrors of modern war, with the release in August of the propaganda film "The Battle of the Somme", which used actual footage from the first days of the battle.
    Memorial 1916 
    In Memory of Lieutenant A J MOTYER, 2nd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, who died on Friday, 15th September 1916 
    • Remembered with honour, SUNKEN GARDEN CEMETERY, CONTALMAISON, Somme, France.

      In the perpetual care of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
    Military Service 1916 

  • Notes 
    • (Medical):«b»Lieutenant Arthur John Motyer
      «/b»Canadian Field Artillery

      Killed in action aged 30
      Buried at Sunken Road Cemetery, Contalmaison Plot II. B. 9.

      Arthur John was born in Hamilton, Bermuda. His father, Ephraim Motyer, born in Bridport, Dorset in 1856, later emigrated and became a building contractor in Bermuda.

      After being educated locally, he went to Mount Allison University in New Brunswick, Canada and graduated with a degree in Mathematics. He came to Christ Church in 1909 as a Rhodes Scholar, the first from Bermuda, and read Physics. His education continued at McGill University where he studied electrical engineering.

      Arthur John travelled widely. Sailing lists show him leaving Bermuda in 1902, 1905, and 1908 for St. John's, New Brunswick, or Halifax, Nova Scotia, and in 1909, 1911 and 1913 for New York. At the time of the 1911 Canadian Census, he was living in Hamilton, Ontario.

      Before the war, he served with the King's Colonial in England for two years, and with the 2nd Dragoon Guards in Canada for a year. He joined up at Quebec on 26 September 1914. Having served in the ranks, he was commissioned with the rank of Lieutenant in the 2nd Brigade Canadian Field Artillery, as a communications expert.

      On 22 May 1915 The Royal Gazette, Hamilton published the following:

      PRIVATE A. J. MOTYER rumour has been in circulation during the past week, starting as such rumours do, from what source no one knows, to the effect that Private A. J. Motyer had been taken prisoner. is gratifying to know that his parents have by this mail, received a card from him, dated April 25th saying "Quite well". It would spare much pain and anxiety to those with friends at the seat of war if more caution was observed in the repeating of unfounded rumours.

      He was killed at Contalmaison on September 15th 1916 whilst helping lay a telephone wire down on top of a wall. When he was shot a man from the Red Cross went up on the wall to rescue him. He, too, was shot and killed. Another man went up and brought down both bodies.

      His only brother named his son Arthur, and Arthur followed in his uncle's footsteps by gaining a Rhode's Scholarship.

  • Sources 
    1. [S50] Internet: Website: Education: Mount Allison, accessed 8 Sep 2011), The Alumni Directory - Search. (Reliability: 3).